Skip to content

Tag: Software

Implementing a Key-Value Store – Part 1: What are key-value stores, and why implement one?

This is Part 1 of the IKVS series, ā€œImplementing a Key-Value Storeā€. You can also check the Table of Contents for other parts.

In this article, I will start with a short description of what key-value stores are. Then, I will explain the reasons behind this project, and finally I will expose the main goals for the key-value store that I am planning to implement. Here is the list of the things I will cover in this article:

1. A quick overview of key-value stores
2. Key-value stores versus relational databases
3. Why implement a key-value store
4. The plan

How I successfully tested and rejected two niche markets using online surveys

I recently got some interest for micro-ISV projects (micro independent software vendor). These are small products/startups that require minimal time and financial investment, and generate small but steady revenue. The idea is that I would not build it myself, I would outsource it so that I can focus on other things than code. The time investment I am aiming at is around 4-6 hours per week. I am now researching niche markets in an attempt to create my first micro-ISV.

The paths followed by successful micro-ISVs have similarities, as they all include testing the market before doing anything else. Testing can take various forms, it can be a sales website, a prototype, or even a shadow product (faking the product and doing the computer’s work by hand before spending time actually coding the product). I recently had a couple of ideas for micro-ISVs and I wanted to test them before building anything, instead of wasting time coding something nobody wants. So here is at the story of how I tested and rejected two niche markets using online surveys. Please note that I am not explaining how I designed the surveys, but just what was the process of using surveys as a way to test niche markets. I will cover survey design in a future article.

The Gold Rush of Software

During the Gold Rush of California in 1849, thousands of men were ready to put at stake all they had in the hope of a better life. The software industry that we are currently experiencing shows, to a certain extent, very similar patterns. Smartphone and source code have replaced the traditional pick and scoop, however the goals and hopes remained the same. But is there anything for developers to expect from this gold rush of software?